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Adding Prandial Insulin to Basal Insulin Plus Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in Chinese Patients with Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Open-Label, Single-Arm Study

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetes Therapy, March 2017
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Title
Adding Prandial Insulin to Basal Insulin Plus Oral Antidiabetic Drugs in Chinese Patients with Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Open-Label, Single-Arm Study
Published in
Diabetes Therapy, March 2017
DOI 10.1007/s13300-017-0247-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yujing Jin, Xiaowei Sun, Xichen Zhao, Tiehong Zhu

Abstract

There is relatively little data from China on the efficacy and safety of adding prandial insulin to basal insulin plus oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs) in people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study assessed the efficacy and safety of basal insulin dose optimization followed by the addition of prandial insulin in Chinese people with T2DM achieving suboptimal glycemic control with basal insulin and OADs. In this open-label, single-arm study, adults with T2DM receiving basal insulin plus OADs underwent insulin dose optimization for 12 weeks. At week 12, subjects who achieved fasting blood glucose (FBG) ≤6.5 mmol/L but not HbA1c ≤7% added one injection of prandial insulin at the main meal for an additional 24 weeks. Endpoints included mean HbA1c, the achievement rate of HbA1c ≤7%, hypoglycemia, and other adverse events (AEs). A total of 120 subjects underwent basal insulin optimization; At week 12, 110 study subjects achieved FBG ≤6.5 mmol/L, of whom 66 did not achieve HbA1c ≤7% and therefore initiated prandial insulin. Three patients discontinued prandial insulin due to dissatisfaction with treatment outcome (n = 1), accidental injury (n = 1), or personal reasons (n = 1). After 24 weeks of basal-plus treatment, mean HbA1c significantly decreased (8.06% to 7.17%; p < 0.001), 65.1% of subjects achieved HbA1c ≤7%, there was no change in FBG (6.23-6.20 mmol/L; p = 0.118), and mean post-prandial blood glucose decreased (13.17-10.14 mmol/L; p < 0.001). During basal-plus treatment, three individuals experienced hypoglycemia, and no significant change in the mean subject weight was observed (73.2 vs. 73.3 kg; p = 0.379). In people with T2DM who are achieving suboptimal glycemic control with basal insulin plus OADs, basal insulin dose optimization followed by the addition of prandial insulin improves glycemic control, is well tolerated, and is associated with a low incidence of hypoglycemia.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 33%
Other 2 33%
Researcher 1 17%
Librarian 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 50%
Psychology 1 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 17%
Engineering 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2017.
All research outputs
#7,065,351
of 9,272,034 outputs
Outputs from Diabetes Therapy
#199
of 341 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,476
of 260,734 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetes Therapy
#17
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,272,034 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 341 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.