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Long-term dietary nitrite and nitrate deficiency causes the metabolic syndrome, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular death in mice

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetologia, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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64 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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36 Mendeley
Title
Long-term dietary nitrite and nitrate deficiency causes the metabolic syndrome, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular death in mice
Published in
Diabetologia, March 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00125-017-4259-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mika Kina-Tanada, Mayuko Sakanashi, Akihide Tanimoto, Tadashi Kaname, Toshihiro Matsuzaki, Katsuhiko Noguchi, Taro Uchida, Junko Nakasone, Chisayo Kozuka, Masayoshi Ishida, Haruaki Kubota, Yuji Taira, Yuichi Totsuka, Shin-ichiro Kina, Hajime Sunakawa, Junichi Omura, Kimio Satoh, Hiroaki Shimokawa, Nobuyuki Yanagihara, Shiro Maeda, Yusuke Ohya, Masayuki Matsushita, Hiroaki Masuzaki, Akira Arasaki, Masato Tsutsui

Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesised not only from L-arginine by NO synthases (NOSs), but also from its inert metabolites, nitrite and nitrate. Green leafy vegetables are abundant in nitrate, but whether or not a deficiency in dietary nitrite/nitrate spontaneously causes disease remains to be clarified. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that long-term dietary nitrite/nitrate deficiency would induce the metabolic syndrome in mice. To this end, we prepared a low-nitrite/nitrate diet (LND) consisting of an amino acid-based low-nitrite/nitrate chow, in which the contents of L-arginine, fat, carbohydrates, protein and energy were identical with a regular chow, and potable ultrapure water. Nitrite and nitrate were undetectable in both the chow and the water. Three months of the LND did not affect food or water intake in wild-type C57BL/6J mice compared with a regular diet (RD). However, in comparison with the RD, 3 months of the LND significantly elicited visceral adiposity, dyslipidaemia and glucose intolerance. Eighteen months of the LND significantly provoked increased body weight, hypertension, insulin resistance and impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine, while 22 months of the LND significantly led to death mainly due to cardiovascular disease, including acute myocardial infarction. These abnormalities were reversed by simultaneous treatment with sodium nitrate, and were significantly associated with endothelial NOS downregulation, adiponectin insufficiency and dysbiosis of the gut microbiota. These results provide the first evidence that long-term dietary nitrite/nitrate deficiency gives rise to the metabolic syndrome, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular death in mice, indicating a novel pathogenetic role of the exogenous NO production system in the metabolic syndrome and its vascular complications.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 64 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Unspecified 6 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 17%
Other 5 14%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 22%
Unspecified 8 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 17%
Materials Science 2 6%
Other 5 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2017.
All research outputs
#474,787
of 13,630,849 outputs
Outputs from Diabetologia
#313
of 3,888 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,631
of 261,249 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetologia
#16
of 67 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,630,849 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,888 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,249 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 67 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.