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Right away: A late, right-lateralized category effect complements an early, left-lateralized category effect in visual search

Overview of attention for article published in Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, March 2017
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Title
Right away: A late, right-lateralized category effect complements an early, left-lateralized category effect in visual search
Published in
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, March 2017
DOI 10.3758/s13423-017-1246-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Merryn D. Constable, Stefanie I. Becker

Abstract

According to the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, learned semantic categories can influence early perceptual processes. A central finding in support of this view is the lateralized category effect-namely, the finding that categorically different colors (e.g., blue and green hues) can be discriminated faster than colors within the same color category (e.g., different hues of green), especially when they are presented in the right visual field. Because the right visual field projects to the left hemisphere, this finding has been popularly couched in terms of the left-lateralization of language. However, other studies have reported bilateral category effects, which has led some researchers to question the linguistic origins of the effect. Here we examined the time course of lateralized and bilateral category effects in the classical visual search paradigm by means of eyetracking and RT distribution analyses. Our results show a bilateral category effect in the manual responses, which is combined of an early, left-lateralized category effect and a later, right-lateralized category effect. The newly discovered late, right-lateralized category effect occurred only when observers had difficulty locating the target, indicating a specialization of the right hemisphere to find categorically different targets after an initial error. The finding that early and late stages of visual search show different lateralized category effects can explain a wide range of previously discrepant findings.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 33%
Researcher 3 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Unspecified 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 6 67%
Unspecified 2 22%
Neuroscience 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 March 2017.
All research outputs
#8,029,921
of 9,264,233 outputs
Outputs from Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
#1,353
of 1,449 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#219,271
of 260,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
#50
of 61 outputs
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