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High-flow nasal cannula oxygen for bronchiolitis in a pediatric ward: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Pediatrics, July 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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65 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
143 Mendeley
Title
High-flow nasal cannula oxygen for bronchiolitis in a pediatric ward: a pilot study
Published in
European Journal of Pediatrics, July 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00431-013-2094-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Silvia Bressan, Marco Balzani, Baruch Krauss, Andrea Pettenazzo, Stefania Zanconato, Eugenio Baraldi

Abstract

High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) is a widely used ventilatory support in children with bronchiolitis in the intensive care setting. No data is available on HFNC use in the general pediatric ward. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HFNC oxygen therapy in infants hospitalized in a pediatric ward for moderate-severe bronchiolitis and to assess the changes in ventilatory parameters before and after starting HFNC support. This prospective observational pilot study was carried out during the bronchiolitis season 2011-2012 in a pediatric tertiary care academic center in Italy. Interruptions of HFNC therapy and possible side effects or escalation to other forms of respiratory support were recorded. Oxygen saturation (SpO2), end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2), and respiratory rate (RR), measured for a baseline period of 1 h before and at specific time intervals in 48 h after the start of HFNC were recorded. Twenty-seven infants were included (median age 1.3 months; absolute range 0.3-8.5). No adverse events, no premature HFNC therapy termination, and no escalation to other forms of respiratory support were recorded. Median SpO2 significantly increased by 1-2 points after changing from standard oxygen to HFNC (p <0.001). Median ETCO2 and RR rapidly decreased by 6-8 mmHg and 13-20 breaths per minute, respectively, in the first 3 h of HFNC therapy (p <0.001) and remained steady thereafter. Conclusions: Use of HFNC for oxygen administration is feasible for infants with moderate-severe bronchiolitis in a general pediatric ward. In these children, HFNC therapy improves oxygen saturation levels and seems to be associated with a decrease in both ETCO2 and RR.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 143 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 138 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 24 17%
Other 23 16%
Student > Postgraduate 21 15%
Student > Master 18 13%
Student > Bachelor 12 8%
Other 45 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 103 72%
Unspecified 21 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Engineering 2 1%
Other 6 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2016.
All research outputs
#3,053,676
of 12,220,965 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Pediatrics
#437
of 2,136 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,473
of 164,009 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Pediatrics
#8
of 70 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,965 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,136 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 164,009 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 70 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.