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Examining the Possible Functions of Kissing in Romantic Relationships

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, October 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#12 of 2,518)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
37 news outlets
blogs
14 blogs
twitter
50 tweeters
facebook
13 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
80 Mendeley
Title
Examining the Possible Functions of Kissing in Romantic Relationships
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, October 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10508-013-0190-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rafael Wlodarski, Robin I. M. Dunbar

Abstract

Recent research suggests that romantic kissing may be utilized in human sexual relationships to evaluate aspects of a potential mate's suitability, to mediate feelings of attachment between pair-bonded individuals, or to facilitate arousal and initiate sexual relations. This study explored these potential functions of romantic kissing by examining attitudes towards the importance of kissing in the context of various human mating situations. The study involved an international online questionnaire, which was completed by 308 male and 594 female participants aged 18-63 years. Support was found for the hypothesis that kissing serves a useful mate-assessment function: women, high mate-value participants, and participants high in sociosexual orientation placed greater importance on kissing in romantic relationships and stated that an initial kiss was more likely to affect their attraction to a potential mate than did men, low-mate value participants or low sociosexual orientation participants. Kissing also seemed to be utilized in the mediation of pair-bond attachments: kissing was seen to be more important at established stages of relationships by low sociosexual participants, kissing was generally seen as more important in long-term relationship contexts (but particularly so by women), and kissing frequency was found to be related to relationship satisfaction. The findings of this research showed very little evidence to support the hypothesis that the primary function of kissing is to elevate levels of arousal.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 50 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Luxembourg 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 1%
Austria 1 1%
Unknown 73 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 20%
Student > Bachelor 12 15%
Researcher 11 14%
Student > Master 10 13%
Student > Postgraduate 7 9%
Other 24 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 31 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 11%
Social Sciences 8 10%
Unspecified 8 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 8%
Other 18 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 427. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2019.
All research outputs
#22,586
of 13,536,855 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#12
of 2,518 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#258
of 166,292 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#1
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,536,855 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,518 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 166,292 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.