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The Relationship between Increases in Morning Spot Urinary Glucose Excretion and Decreases in HbA1C in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes After Taking an SGLT2 Inhibitor: A Retrospective, Longitudinal…

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetes Therapy, March 2017
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Title
The Relationship between Increases in Morning Spot Urinary Glucose Excretion and Decreases in HbA1C in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes After Taking an SGLT2 Inhibitor: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Study
Published in
Diabetes Therapy, March 2017
DOI 10.1007/s13300-017-0248-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

So Ra Kim, Yong-ho Lee, Eun Seok Kang, Bong-Soo Cha, Byung-Wan Lee

Abstract

Sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors increase urinary glucose excretion (UGE) by reducing the renal threshold for glucose excretion, which results in decreased serum glucose concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). However, no study to date has determined whether larger increases in UGE after SGLT2 inhibitor treatment correspond to larger reductions in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C). We enrolled participants who were newly prescribed an SGLT2 inhibitor (dapagliflozin 10 mg or ipragliflozin 50 mg, once daily) as an add-on therapy. Patients were tested for HbA1C and first morning spot urinary-creatinine and -glucose concentrations immediately prior to administration of the SGLT2 inhibitor and at a 12-week follow-up appointment. We investigated the relationship between increases in morning spot UGE and decreases in HbA1C. A total of 101 participants with T2D were enrolled. The median age and diabetes duration were 61.0 and 12.8 years, respectively, and the median HbA1C was 8.10%. SGLT2 inhibitors significantly lowered the HbA1C level, with a median change from baseline to week 12 of -0.60% (p < 0.001). Robust increases from baseline were seen for the morning spot urinary glucose-to-creatinine ratio (UGCR), with a median change at week 12 of 47.3 mg/mg. In the correlation analysis, the ∆HbA1C level showed a significant positive correlation with ∆morning spot UGCR (r = 0.395, p < 0.001). In other words, a greater reduction in HbA1C was correlated with a smaller increase in UGE. After adjusting for confounding variables, ∆HbA1C was significantly associated with ∆morning spot UGCR. Although SGLT2 inhibitor treatment leads to a reduced HbA1C level by augmenting UGE, larger increases in UGE do not correlate to larger reductions in HbA1C. This suggests that the increase in UGE might not be an indicator of the degree of reductions in blood glucose.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 33%
Researcher 2 22%
Professor 2 22%
Librarian 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 56%
Unspecified 4 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 March 2017.
All research outputs
#7,048,001
of 9,247,714 outputs
Outputs from Diabetes Therapy
#193
of 336 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,180
of 259,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetes Therapy
#16
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,247,714 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 336 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.