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A Meta-analytic Review of Components Associated with Parent Training Program Effectiveness

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, January 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#45 of 1,513)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
5 policy sources
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
718 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
632 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
A Meta-analytic Review of Components Associated with Parent Training Program Effectiveness
Published in
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, January 2008
DOI 10.1007/s10802-007-9201-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer Wyatt Kaminski, Linda Anne Valle, Jill H. Filene, Cynthia L. Boyle

Abstract

This component analysis used meta-analytic techniques to synthesize the results of 77 published evaluations of parent training programs (i.e., programs that included the active acquisition of parenting skills) to enhance behavior and adjustment in children aged 0-7. Characteristics of program content and delivery method were used to predict effect sizes on measures of parenting behaviors and children's externalizing behavior. After controlling for differences attributable to research design, program components consistently associated with larger effects included increasing positive parent-child interactions and emotional communication skills, teaching parents to use time out and the importance of parenting consistency, and requiring parents to practice new skills with their children during parent training sessions. Program components consistently associated with smaller effects included teaching parents problem solving; teaching parents to promote children's cognitive, academic, or social skills; and providing other, additional services. The results have implications for selection and strengthening of existing parent training programs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 632 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 13 2%
Canada 3 <1%
Australia 3 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 3 <1%
Unknown 602 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 144 23%
Student > Master 111 18%
Researcher 99 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 77 12%
Student > Bachelor 44 7%
Other 157 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 320 51%
Social Sciences 146 23%
Unspecified 72 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 41 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 2%
Other 41 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2018.
All research outputs
#580,756
of 13,040,640 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
#45
of 1,513 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,877
of 164,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology
#1
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,040,640 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,513 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 164,372 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.