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The determination of pharmaceutical residues in cooked and uncooked marine bivalves using pressurised liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

Overview of attention for article published in Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry, October 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
The determination of pharmaceutical residues in cooked and uncooked marine bivalves using pressurised liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry
Published in
Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry, October 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00216-013-7371-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gillian McEneff, Leon Barron, Brian Kelleher, Brett Paull, Brian Quinn

Abstract

An optimised and validated method for the determination of pharmaceutical residues in blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) is presented herein, as well as an investigation of the effect of cooking (by steaming) on any potential difference in human exposure risk. Selected pharmaceuticals included two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac and mefenamic acid), an antibiotic (trimethoprim), an anti-epileptic (carbamazepine) and a lipid regulator (gemfibrozil). An in vivo exposure experiment was set up in the laboratory in which mussels were exposed either directly by injection (10 ng) or daily through spiked artificial seawater (ASW) over 96 h. In liquid matrices, pharmaceutical residues were either determined using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) directly, or in combination with solid-phase extraction (SPE) for analyte concentration purposes. The extraction of pharmaceuticals from mussel tissues used an additional pressurised liquid extraction step prior to SPE and LCMS/MS. Limits of quantification of between 2 and 46 ng L−1 were achieved for extracted cooking water and ASW, between 2 and 64 μg L−1 for ASW in exposure tanks, and between 4 and 29 ng g−1 for mussel tissue. Method linearities were achieved for pharmaceuticals in each matrix with correlation coefficients of R2>0.975. A selection of exposed mussels was also cooked (via steaming) and analysed using the optimised method to observe any effect on detectable concentrations of parent pharmaceuticals present. An overall increase in pharmaceutical residues in the contaminated mussel tissue and cooking water was observed after cooking.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 40%
Student > Master 9 19%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Professor 2 4%
Other 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 15 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 21%
Chemistry 9 19%
Unspecified 6 13%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2014.
All research outputs
#7,030,233
of 12,230,555 outputs
Outputs from Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry
#2,132
of 4,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,660
of 162,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Analytical & Bioanalytical Chemistry
#19
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,230,555 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,657 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 162,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.