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Accessing Local Knowledge to Identify Where Species of Conservation Concern Occur in a Tropical Forest Landscape

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Management, May 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

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1 blog

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90 Mendeley
Title
Accessing Local Knowledge to Identify Where Species of Conservation Concern Occur in a Tropical Forest Landscape
Published in
Environmental Management, May 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00267-013-0051-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael Padmanaba, Douglas Sheil, Imam Basuki, Nining Liswanti

Abstract

Conventional biodiversity surveys play an important role in ensuring good conservation friendly management in tropical forest regions but are demanding in terms of expertise, time, and budget. Can local people help? Here, we illustrate how local knowledge can support low cost conservation surveys. We worked in the Malinau watershed, East Kalimantan, Indonesia, an area currently at risk of extensive forest loss. We selected eight species of regional conservation interest: rafflesia (Rafflesia spp.), black orchid (Coelogyne pandurata), sun bear (Helarctos malayanus), tarsier (Tarsius bancanus), slow loris (Nycticebus coucang), proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus), clouded leopard (Neofelis diardi/N. nebulosa), and orang-utan (Pongo pygmaeus). We asked 52 informants in seven villages if, where and when they had observed these species. We used maps, based on both geo-referenced and sketched features, to record these observations. Verification concerns and related issues are discussed. Evaluations suggest our local information is reliable. Our study took 6 weeks and cost about USD 5000. Extensive expert based field surveys across the same region would cost one or two orders of magnitude more. The records extend the known distribution for sun bear, tarsier, slow loris, and clouded leopard. Reports of rafflesia, proboscis monkey, and orang-utan are of immediate conservation significance. While quality concerns should never be abandoned, we conclude that local people can help expand our knowledge of large areas in an effective, reliable, and low cost manner and thus contribute to improved management.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 90 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 2 2%
China 2 2%
Denmark 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Philippines 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 80 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 21%
Student > Master 18 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 19%
Student > Bachelor 16 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Other 16 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 45 50%
Environmental Science 28 31%
Unspecified 6 7%
Social Sciences 5 6%
Computer Science 2 2%
Other 4 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2013.
All research outputs
#582,385
of 3,634,360 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Management
#54
of 387 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,465
of 93,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Management
#3
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,634,360 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 387 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 93,327 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.