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Toward the development of a supported employment program for individuals with high-functioning autism in Germany

Overview of attention for article published in European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience, September 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
86 Mendeley
Title
Toward the development of a supported employment program for individuals with high-functioning autism in Germany
Published in
European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience, September 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00406-013-0455-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. Vogeley, J. C. Kirchner, A. Gawronski, L. Tebartz van Elst, I. Dziobek

Abstract

Human-human interactions are of central relevance for the success in professional and occupational environments, which also substantially influence quality of life. This is especially true in the case of individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA), who experience deficits in social cognition that often lead to social exclusion and unemployment. Despite good education and high motivation, individuals with HFA do not reach employment rates that are substantially higher than 50 %. This is an alarmingly high rate of unemployment considering that the United Nations have recently emphasized the inclusion of handicapped persons as a mandatory human right. To date, the specific needs of autistic persons with respect to their working environment are largely unexplored. It remains moreover an open question how support systems and activities, including newly developed communication devices for professional environments of individuals with HFA, should look like. The German health and social care systems are not adequately prepared for the proper support of this population. This leads us to suggest that supported employment programs should be developed for adults with HFA that specifically address their needs and requirements. Such programs should comprise (1) the adequate assessment of HFA, including a neuropsychological profile and an individual matching of persons' preferences with requirements of the working place, (2) on-the-job coaching activities that include systematic communication and interaction training, and (3) instruction of non-autistic peers, including colleagues and supervisors, about weaknesses and strengths of HFA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 2%
Brazil 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 82 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 20 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Unspecified 13 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Researcher 7 8%
Other 24 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 24%
Unspecified 18 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 17%
Social Sciences 10 12%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 6%
Other 17 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2014.
All research outputs
#6,596,265
of 12,220,306 outputs
Outputs from European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience
#348
of 710 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65,379
of 161,437 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience
#10
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,306 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 710 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 161,437 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.