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Biology and ecology of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, January 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
217 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
251 Mendeley
Title
Biology and ecology of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, January 2010
DOI 10.1186/1756-3305-3-26
Pubmed ID
Authors

Filipe Dantas-Torres

Abstract

The brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) is the most widespread tick in the world and a well-recognized vector of many pathogens affecting dogs and occasionally humans. This tick can be found on dogs living in both urban and rural areas, being highly adapted to live within human dwellings and being active throughout the year not only in tropical and subtropical regions, but also in some temperate areas. Depending on factors such as climate and host availability, Rh. sanguineus can complete up to four generations per year. Recent studies have demonstrated that ticks exposed to high temperatures attach and feed on humans and rabbits more rapidly. This observation suggests that the risk of human parasitism by Rh. sanguineus could increase in areas experiencing warmer and/or longer summers, consequently increasing the risk of transmission of zoonotic agents (e.g., Rickettsia conorii and Rickettsia rickettsii). In the present article, some aspects of the biology and ecology of Rh. sanguineus ticks are discussed including the possible impact of current climate changes on populations of this tick around the world.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 251 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 2%
Spain 2 <1%
Uganda 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Other 3 1%
Unknown 234 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 52 21%
Student > Bachelor 40 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 15%
Researcher 25 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 8%
Other 75 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 105 42%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 55 22%
Unspecified 31 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 8%
Other 18 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 39. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2019.
All research outputs
#424,093
of 13,224,272 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#51
of 3,508 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,395
of 162,528 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,224,272 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,508 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 162,528 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them