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Diffusion of Novel Healthcare Technologies to Resource Poor Settings

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Biomedical Engineering, February 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
35 Mendeley
Title
Diffusion of Novel Healthcare Technologies to Resource Poor Settings
Published in
Annals of Biomedical Engineering, February 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10439-013-0750-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert Malkin, Kim von Oldenburg Beer

Abstract

A new product has completed clinical trials in a distant, resource poor hospital using a few dozen prototypes. The data looks great. The novel medical device solves a widely felt problem. The next goal is to integrate the device into the country's healthcare system and spread the device to other countries. But how? In order to be widely used, the device must be manufactured and distributed. One option is to license the intellectual property (IP) to an interested third party, if one can be found. However, it is possible to manage the manufacturing and distribution without licensing. There are at least two common means for manufacturing a novel medical device targeted to resource poor settings: (a) formal (contract) manufacturing and (b) informal (local) manufacturing. There are three primary routes to diffusion of novel medical devices in the developing world: (1) local distributors (2) direct international sales and (3) international donations. Perhaps surprisingly, the least effective mechanism is direct importation through donation. The most successful mechanism, the method used by nearly all working medical devices in resource-poor settings, is the use of contract manufacturing and a local distributor. This article is written for the biomedical innovator and entrepreneur who wishes to make a novel healthcare technology or product available and accessible to healthcare providers and patients in the developing world. There are very few documented cases and little formal research in this area. To this end, this article describes and explores the manufacturing and distribution options in order to provide insights into when and how each can be applied to scale up a novel technology to make a difference in a resource poor setting.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 33 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 8 23%
Researcher 8 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 20%
Unspecified 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 13 37%
Unspecified 5 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 3 9%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 7 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2016.
All research outputs
#3,116,604
of 12,356,791 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Biomedical Engineering
#241
of 1,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,086
of 155,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Biomedical Engineering
#2
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,356,791 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,206 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 155,225 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.