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Generalist red velvet mite predator (Balaustium sp.) performs better on a mixed diet

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental & Applied Acarology, August 2013
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28 Mendeley
Title
Generalist red velvet mite predator (Balaustium sp.) performs better on a mixed diet
Published in
Experimental & Applied Acarology, August 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10493-013-9727-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen Muñoz-Cárdenas, Luz Stella Fuentes, R. Fernando Cantor, C. Daniel Rodríguez, Arne Janssen, Maurice W. Sabelis

Abstract

Generalist predators have the potential advantage to control more than one pest and to be more persistent than specialist predators because they can survive on different foods. Moreover, their population growth rate may be elevated when offered a mixture of prey species. We studied a generalist predatory mite Balaustium sp. that shows promise for biological control of thrips and whiteflies in protected rose cultures in Colombia. Although starting its life in the soil, this predator makes excursions onto plants where it feeds on various arthropods. We quantified life history parameters of the predator, offering high densities of three pest species: first-instar larvae of Frankliniella occidentalis, eggs of Trialeurodes vaporariorum and Tetranychus urticae, either alone or in combination. The predators completed their life cycle on each diet. The egg-to-egg period was c. 2 months. All eggs were laid in one batch in 1-2 days, indicating a pronounced semelparous reproduction pattern. In general, females reproduced earlier and laid more eggs on mixed diets, and these early reproducers consequently had higher population growth rates than late reproducers. The best diet in terms of egg-to-egg period and juvenile survival was the combination of eggs from whiteflies and spider mites. Spider mite eggs alone and western flower thrips larvae alone were the worst diets. It remains to be investigated whether mixed diets promote the population growth rate of Balaustium sufficiently for biocontrol of whiteflies and thrips in the presence of alternative prey, such as spider mites, to become effective.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 11%
United Kingdom 1 4%
Uruguay 1 4%
Colombia 1 4%
Unknown 22 79%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 29%
Researcher 6 21%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Unspecified 3 11%
Other 5 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 61%
Unspecified 4 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 11%
Environmental Science 3 11%
Chemical Engineering 1 4%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2013.
All research outputs
#7,317,730
of 12,316,795 outputs
Outputs from Experimental & Applied Acarology
#251
of 492 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,618
of 153,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental & Applied Acarology
#3
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,316,795 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 492 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 153,936 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 7 of them.