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Leaf-Miners Co-opt Microorganisms to Enhance their Nutritional Environment

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Chemical Ecology, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

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46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
Title
Leaf-Miners Co-opt Microorganisms to Enhance their Nutritional Environment
Published in
Journal of Chemical Ecology, June 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10886-013-0307-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mélanie Body, Wilfried Kaiser, Géraldine Dubreuil, Jérôme Casas, David Giron

Abstract

Organisms make the best of their mother's oviposition choices and utilize specific feeding options that meet energetic requirements and cope with environmental constraints. This is particularly true for leaf-miner insects that develop enclosed in the two epidermis layers of a single leaf for their entire larval life. Cytokinins (CKs) play a central role in plant physiology - including regulation of senescence and nutrient translocation - and, as such, can be the specific target of plant exploiters that manipulate plant primary metabolism. 'Green-islands' are striking examples of a CK-induced phenotype where green areas are induced by plant pathogens/insects in otherwise yellow senescent leaves. Here, we document how the leaf-miner caterpillar Phyllonorycter blancardella, working through an endosymbiotic bacteria, modifies phytohormonal profiles, not only on senescing (photosynthetically inactive) but also on normal (photosynthetically active) leaf tissues of its host plant (Malus domestica). This leaf physiological manipulation allows the insect to maintain sugar-rich green tissues and to create an enhanced nutritional microenvironment in an otherwise degenerating context. It also allows them to maintain a nutritional homeostasis even under distinct leaf environments. Our study also highlights that only larvae harboring bacterial symbionts contain significant amounts of CKs that are most likely not plant-derived. This suggests that insects are able to provide CKs to the plant through their symbiotic association, thus extending further the role of insect bacterial symbionts in plant-insect interactions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
China 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
India 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
New Zealand 1 2%
Unknown 49 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 21%
Student > Master 8 14%
Professor 6 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 7%
Other 12 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 64%
Unspecified 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 11%
Chemistry 2 4%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 4 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2019.
All research outputs
#1,445,404
of 13,606,441 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Chemical Ecology
#84
of 1,513 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,537
of 158,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Chemical Ecology
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,606,441 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,513 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,565 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them