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How does copayment for health care services affect demand, health and redistribution? A systematic review of the empirical evidence from 1990 to 2011

Overview of attention for article published in The European Journal of Health Economics, August 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 827)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
34 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
49 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
How does copayment for health care services affect demand, health and redistribution? A systematic review of the empirical evidence from 1990 to 2011
Published in
The European Journal of Health Economics, August 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10198-013-0526-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Astrid Kiil, Kurt Houlberg

Abstract

This article reviews the quantitative evidence on the behavioural effects of copayment within the health area across a wide range of countries. The review distinguishes itself from previous similar reviews by having a high degree of transparency for the search strategy used to identify the studies included in the review as well as the criteria for inclusion and by including the most recent literature. Empirical studies were identified by performing searches in EconLit. The literature search identified a total of 47 studies of the behavioural effects of copayment. Considering the demand effects, the majority of the reviewed studies found that copayment reduces the use of prescription medicine, consultations with general practitioners and specialists, and ambulatory care, respectively. The literature found no significant effects of copayment on the prevalence of hospitalisations. The empirical evidence on whether copayment for some services, but not for others, causes substitution from the services that are subject to copayment to the 'free' services rather than lower total use is sparse and mixed. Likewise, the health effects of copayment have only been analysed empirically in a limited number of studies, of which half did not find any significant effects in the short term. Finally, the empirical evidence on the distributional consequences of copayment indicates that individuals with low income and in particular need of care generally reduce their use relatively more than the remaining population in consequence of copayment. Hence, it is clear that copayment involves some important economic and political trade-offs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 74 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 24 30%
Researcher 12 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Unspecified 9 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Other 16 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 24 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 22%
Unspecified 12 15%
Social Sciences 9 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 5%
Other 13 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2018.
All research outputs
#395,131
of 13,645,052 outputs
Outputs from The European Journal of Health Economics
#4
of 827 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,520
of 158,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The European Journal of Health Economics
#1
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,645,052 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 827 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 158,859 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.