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Uptake and adherence to an online intervention for cancer-related distress: older age is not a barrier to adherence but may be a barrier to uptake

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, February 2017
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1 tweeter

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37 Mendeley
Title
Uptake and adherence to an online intervention for cancer-related distress: older age is not a barrier to adherence but may be a barrier to uptake
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, February 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00520-017-3591-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lisa Beatty, Emma Kemp, Claire Binnion, Jane Turner, Donna Milne, Phyllis Butow, Sylvie Lambert, Patsy Yates, Desmond Yip, Bogda Koczwara

Abstract

While online interventions are increasingly explored as an alternative to therapist-based interventions for cancer-related distress, limitations to efficacy potentially include low uptake and adherence. Few predictors of uptake or adherence to online interventions have been consistently identified, particularly in individuals with cancer. This study examined rates and predictors of uptake and adherence to Finding My Way, a RCT of an online intervention versus an information-only online control for cancer-related distress. Participants were adults with cancer treated with curative intent. Adherence was assessed by login frequency, duration and activity level; analyses examined demographic, medical and psychological predictors of uptake and adherence. The study enrolled 191 adults (aged 26-94 years) undergoing active treatment for cancer of any type. Uptake was highest for females and for individuals with ovarian (80%) and breast cancer (49.8%), and lowest for those with melanoma (26.5%). Adherence was predicted by older age and control-group allocation. Baseline distress levels did not predict adherence. High adherers to the full intervention had better emotion regulation and quality of life than low adherers. Uptake of online intervention varies according to age, gender and cancer type. While uptake was higher amongst younger individuals, once enrolled, older individuals were more likely to adhere to online interventions for cancer-related distress.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 19%
Unspecified 6 16%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Other 10 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 10 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 19%
Psychology 7 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 16%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Other 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2017.
All research outputs
#6,990,611
of 9,171,443 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#1,487
of 1,996 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,795
of 253,833 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#53
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,171,443 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,996 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,833 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.