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Declines in Sexual Frequency among American Adults, 1989–2014

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#2 of 2,483)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
178 news outlets
blogs
16 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
307 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
Title
Declines in Sexual Frequency among American Adults, 1989–2014
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, March 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10508-017-0953-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jean M. Twenge, Ryne A. Sherman, Brooke E. Wells

Abstract

American adults had sex about nine fewer times per year in the early 2010s compared to the late 1990s in data from the nationally representative General Social Survey, N = 26,620, 1989-2014. This was partially due to the higher percentage of unpartnered individuals, who have sex less frequently on average. Sexual frequency declined among the partnered (married or living together) but stayed steady among the unpartnered, reducing the marital/partnered advantage for sexual frequency. Declines in sexual frequency were similar across gender, race, region, educational level, and work status and were largest among those in their 50s, those with school-age children, and those who did not watch pornography. In analyses separating the effects of age, time period, and cohort, the decline was primarily due to birth cohort (year of birth, also known as generation). With age and time period controlled, those born in the 1930s (Silent generation) had sex the most often, whereas those born in the 1990s (Millennials and iGen) had sex the least often. The decline was not linked to longer working hours or increased pornography use. Age had a strong effect on sexual frequency: Americans in their 20s had sex an average of about 80 times per year, compared to about 20 times per year for those in their 60s. The results suggest that Americans are having sex less frequently due to two primary factors: An increasing number of individuals without a steady or marital partner and a decline in sexual frequency among those with partners.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 307 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Luxembourg 1 2%
Unknown 60 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 11 18%
Student > Master 10 16%
Other 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 10%
Other 20 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 18 29%
Unspecified 16 26%
Social Sciences 6 10%
Philosophy 3 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 5%
Other 16 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1738. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2019.
All research outputs
#1,068
of 13,382,863 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#2
of 2,483 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#65
of 257,739 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#2
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,382,863 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,483 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,739 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.