↓ Skip to main content

Integration or Fragmentation? Racial Diversity and the American Future

Overview of attention for article published in Demography, February 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
120 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
190 Mendeley
Title
Integration or Fragmentation? Racial Diversity and the American Future
Published in
Demography, February 2013
DOI 10.1007/s13524-013-0197-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel T. Lichter

Abstract

Over the next generation or two, America's older, largely white population will increasingly be replaced by today's disproportionately poor minority children. All future growth will come from populations other than non-Hispanic whites as America moves toward a majority-minority society by 2043. This so-called Third Demographic Transition raises important implications about changing racial boundaries in the United States, that is, about the physical, economic, and sociocultural barriers that separate different racial and ethnic groups. America's racial transformation may place upward demographic pressure on future poverty and inequality as today's disproportionately poor and minority children grow into adult roles. Racial boundaries will be reshaped by the changing meaning of race and ethnicity, shifting patterns of racial segregation in neighborhoods and the workplace, newly integrating (or not) friendship networks, and changing rates of interracial marriage and childbearing. The empirical literature provides complicated lessons and offers few guarantees that growing racial diversity will lead to a corresponding breakdown in racial boundaries-that whites and minorities will increasingly share the same physical and social spaces or interact as coequals. How America's older population of elected officials and taxpayers responds today to America's increasingly diverse population will provide a window to the future, when today's children successfully transition (or not) into productive adult roles. Racial and ethnic inclusion will be reshaped by changing ethnoracial inequality, which highlights the need to invest in children-now.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 190 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 184 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 80 42%
Student > Doctoral Student 32 17%
Student > Master 22 12%
Student > Bachelor 11 6%
Professor 10 5%
Other 26 14%
Unknown 9 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 127 67%
Psychology 12 6%
Arts and Humanities 9 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 8 4%
Computer Science 5 3%
Other 17 9%
Unknown 12 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 80. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2020.
All research outputs
#264,786
of 15,467,953 outputs
Outputs from Demography
#75
of 1,541 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,949
of 162,086 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Demography
#1
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,467,953 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,541 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 162,086 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.