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Behavioral and Social Sciences at the National Institutes of Health: adoption of research findings in health research and practice as a scientific priority

Overview of attention for article published in Translational Behavioral Medicine, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
Behavioral and Social Sciences at the National Institutes of Health: adoption of research findings in health research and practice as a scientific priority
Published in
Translational Behavioral Medicine, February 2017
DOI 10.1007/s13142-017-0474-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

William T. Riley

Abstract

The National Institutes of Health's Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) recently released its Strategic Plan for 2017 to 2021. This plan highlights three scientific priorities: (1) improve the synergy of basic and applied behavioral and social sciences research, (2) enhance and promote the research infrastructure, methods, and measures needed to support a more cumulative and integrated approach to behavioral and social sciences research, and (3) facilitate the adoption of behavioral and social sciences research findings in health research and in practice. This commentary focuses on the challenges and opportunities to facilitate the adoption of research findings in health research and in practice. In addition to the ongoing NIH support for dissemination and implementation (D&I) research, we must address transformative challenges and opportunities such as better disseminating and implementing D&I research, merging research and practice, adopting more rigorous and diverse methods and measures for both D&I and clinical trials research, evaluating technological-based delivery of interventions, and transitioning from minimally adaptable intervention packages to planned adaptations rooted in behavior change principles. Beyond translation into practice and policy, the OBSSR Strategic Plan also highlights the need for translation of behavioral and social science findings into the broader biomedical research enterprise.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 36%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Student > Master 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 5 45%
Unspecified 2 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Decision Sciences 1 9%
Other 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2017.
All research outputs
#2,535,654
of 11,357,505 outputs
Outputs from Translational Behavioral Medicine
#133
of 445 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,754
of 258,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Translational Behavioral Medicine
#10
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,357,505 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 445 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,587 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.