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Place and Child Health: The Interaction of Population Density and Sanitation in Developing Countries

Overview of attention for article published in Demography, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
118 Mendeley
Title
Place and Child Health: The Interaction of Population Density and Sanitation in Developing Countries
Published in
Demography, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/s13524-016-0538-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Payal Hathi, Sabrina Haque, Lovey Pant, Diane Coffey, Dean Spears

Abstract

A long literature in demography has debated the importance of place for health, especially children's health. In this study, we assess whether the importance of dense settlement for infant mortality and child height is moderated by exposure to local sanitation behavior. Is open defecation (i.e., without a toilet or latrine) worse for infant mortality and child height where population density is greater? Is poor sanitation is an important mechanism by which population density influences child health outcomes? We present two complementary analyses using newly assembled data sets, which represent two points in a trade-off between external and internal validity. First, we concentrate on external validity by studying infant mortality and child height in a large, international child-level data set of 172 Demographic and Health Surveys, matched to census population density data for 1,800 subnational regions. Second, we concentrate on internal validity by studying child height in Bangladeshi districts, using a new data set constructed with GIS techniques that allows us to control for fixed effects at a high level of geographic resolution. We find a statistically robust and quantitatively comparable interaction between sanitation and population density with both approaches: open defecation externalities are more important for child health outcomes where people live more closely together.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Croatia 1 <1%
Nigeria 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 114 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 26%
Student > Master 27 23%
Researcher 20 17%
Unspecified 12 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 4%
Other 23 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 27 23%
Environmental Science 19 16%
Unspecified 19 16%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 12 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 8%
Other 31 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 September 2019.
All research outputs
#1,019,418
of 13,716,038 outputs
Outputs from Demography
#308
of 1,401 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,632
of 257,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Demography
#12
of 28 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,716,038 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,401 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,871 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 28 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.