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Capulavirus and Grablovirus: two new genera in the family Geminiviridae

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Virology, February 2017
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Title
Capulavirus and Grablovirus: two new genera in the family Geminiviridae
Published in
Archives of Virology, February 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00705-017-3268-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arvind Varsani, Philippe Roumagnac, Marc Fuchs, Jesús Navas-Castillo, Enrique Moriones, Ali Idris, Rob W. Briddon, Rafael Rivera-Bustamante, F. Murilo Zerbini, Darren P Martin

Abstract

Geminiviruses are plant-infecting single-stranded DNA viruses that occur in most parts of the world. Currently, there are seven genera within the family Geminiviridae (Becurtovirus, Begomovirus, Curtovirus, Eragrovirus, Mastrevirus, Topocuvirus and Turncurtovirus). The rate of discovery of new geminiviruses has increased significantly over the last decade as a result of new molecular tools and approaches (rolling-circle amplification and deep sequencing) that allow for high-throughput workflows. Here, we report the establishment of two new genera: Capulavirus, with four new species (Alfalfa leaf curl virus, Euphorbia caput-medusae latent virus, French bean severe leaf curl virus and Plantago lanceolata latent virus), and Grablovirus, with one new species (Grapevine red blotch virus). The aphid species Aphis craccivora has been shown to be a vector for Alfalfa leaf curl virus, and the treehopper species Spissistilus festinus is the likely vector of Grapevine red blotch virus. In addition, two highly divergent groups of viruses found infecting citrus and mulberry plants have been assigned to the new species Citrus chlorotic dwarf associated virus and Mulberry mosaic dwarf associated virus, respectively. These species have been left unassigned to a genus by the ICTV because their particle morphology and insect vectors are unknown.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 95 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 20%
Unspecified 18 19%
Student > Master 17 18%
Student > Bachelor 12 12%
Researcher 10 10%
Other 21 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 58 60%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 20%
Unspecified 17 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2017.
All research outputs
#8,458,693
of 9,722,896 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Virology
#1,376
of 1,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,373
of 256,222 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Virology
#25
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,722,896 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,852 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.