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Reduced sensitivity for visual textures affects judgments of shape-from-shading and step-climbing behaviour in older adults

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Brain Research, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
23 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
Title
Reduced sensitivity for visual textures affects judgments of shape-from-shading and step-climbing behaviour in older adults
Published in
Experimental Brain Research, November 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00221-016-4816-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew J. Schofield, Benjamin Curzon-Jones, Mark A. Hollands

Abstract

Falls on stairs are a major hazard for older adults. Visual decline in normal ageing can affect step-climbing ability, altering gait and reducing toe clearance. Here we show that a loss of fine-grained visual information associated with age can affect the perception of surface undulations in patterned surfaces. We go on to show that such cues affect the limb trajectories of young adults, but due to their lack of sensitivity, not that of older adults. Interestingly neither the perceived height of a step nor conscious awareness is altered by our visual manipulation, but stepping behaviour is, suggesting that the influence of shape perception on stepping behaviour is via the unconscious, action-centred, dorsal visual pathway.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 7%
Unknown 14 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 20%
Unspecified 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 27%
Psychology 4 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Sports and Recreations 1 7%
Computer Science 1 7%
Other 3 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2018.
All research outputs
#1,070,682
of 13,206,892 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Brain Research
#92
of 2,269 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,225
of 348,729 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Brain Research
#7
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,206,892 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,269 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 348,729 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.