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What we may expect from novel antibacterial agents in the pipeline with respect to resistance and pharmacodynamic principles

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 156)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
What we may expect from novel antibacterial agents in the pipeline with respect to resistance and pharmacodynamic principles
Published in
Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics, February 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10928-017-9506-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen Bush, Malcolm G. P. Page

Abstract

There are some 43 small molecules in the antibiotic development pipeline from late preclinical stage (7 compounds) through Phase 1 (11 molecules), Phase 2 (13 molecules) to Phase 3 (12 molecules). The majority of these are representatives of established antibiotic classes that have been modified to address problems of resistance. In addition, there is considerable activity around the discovery of novel classes of β-lactamase inhibitors with 10 combinations representing 4 inhibitor classes, at different stages of development. The combination of such inhibitors, which have broad activity against serine β-lactamases and may even inhibit some penicillin binding proteins, with carbapenems, cephalosporins or aztreonam, provides enhanced activity against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria. There are 6 molecules representing novel classes of antibiotics but only one of these, murepavadin, is expected to have activity against a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Although the new analogues of existing classes, and novel combinations, have been designed to address specific resistance problems, it is by no means certain than they will not be affected by the general mechanisms of resistance, particularly decreased net flux across the Gram-negative outer membrane. The potential impact of resistance mechanisms on the new agents is assessed and the ways in which PK/PD studies are used to design dosing regimens for the new agents, especially combinations, as well as to improve dosing of existing antibiotics are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Norway 1 2%
Belgium 1 2%
Unknown 52 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 27%
Researcher 11 20%
Student > Master 6 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 9%
Unspecified 5 9%
Other 13 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 31%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 9 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 13%
Unspecified 7 13%
Chemistry 6 11%
Other 9 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 October 2017.
All research outputs
#3,048,247
of 12,917,145 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics
#17
of 156 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,182
of 344,246 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,917,145 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 156 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,246 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them