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Lower educational level and unemployment increase the impact of cardiometabolic conditions on the quality of life: results of a population-based study in South Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Quality of Life Research, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
Title
Lower educational level and unemployment increase the impact of cardiometabolic conditions on the quality of life: results of a population-based study in South Australia
Published in
Quality of Life Research, February 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11136-017-1503-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Alejandro González-Chica, Robert Adams, Eleonora Dal Grande, Jodie Avery, Phillipa Hay, Nigel Stocks

Abstract

To investigate if sociodemographic characteristics increase the adverse effects of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRF) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Cross-sectional, face-to-face survey investigating 2379 adults living in South Australia in 2015 (57.1 ± 14 years; 51.7% females). Questions included diagnosis of CMRF (obesity, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidaemia) and CVD. Physical and mental HRQoL were assessed using the SF-12v1 questionnaire. Multiple linear regression models including confounders (sociodemographic, lifestyle, use of preventive medication) and interaction terms between sociodemographic variables and cardiometabolic conditions were used in adjusted analysis. The prevalence of CMRF (one or more) was 54.6% and CVD was 13.0%. The physical HRQoL reduced from 50.8 (95%CI 50.2-51.4) in healthy individuals to 45.1 (95%CI 44.4-45.9) and 39.1 (95%CI 37.7-40.5) among those with CMRF and CVD, respectively. Adjustment for sociodemographic variables reduced these differences in 33%, remaining stable after controlling for lifestyle and use of preventive medications (p < 0.001). Differences in physical HRQoL according to cardiometabolic conditions were twice as high among those with lower educational level, or if they were not working. Among unemployed, having a CMRF or a CVD had the same impact on the physical HRQoL (9.7 lower score than healthy individuals). The inverse association between cardiometabolic conditions and mental HRQoL was subtle (p = 0.030), with no evidence of disparities due to sociodemographic variables. A lower educational level and unemployment increase the adverse effects of cardiometabolic conditions on the physical HRQoL. Targeted interventions for reducing CMRF and/or CVD in these groups are necessary to improve HRQoL.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 31%
Student > Master 9 28%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Social Sciences 4 13%
Unspecified 3 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Other 8 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2017.
All research outputs
#3,196,614
of 12,002,078 outputs
Outputs from Quality of Life Research
#333
of 1,685 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#106,348
of 331,442 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Quality of Life Research
#7
of 62 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,002,078 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,685 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,442 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 62 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.