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Summarizing US Wildlife Trade with an Eye Toward Assessing the Risk of Infectious Disease Introduction

Overview of attention for article published in EcoHealth, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 536)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
Title
Summarizing US Wildlife Trade with an Eye Toward Assessing the Risk of Infectious Disease Introduction
Published in
EcoHealth, February 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10393-017-1211-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. M. Smith, C. Zambrana-Torrelio, A. White, M. Asmussen, C. Machalaba, S. Kennedy, K. Lopez, T. M. Wolf, P. Daszak, D. A. Travis, W. B. Karesh

Abstract

The aim of this study was to characterize the role of the USA in the global exchange of wildlife and describe high volume trade with an eye toward prioritizing health risk assessment questions for further analysis. Here we summarize nearly 14 years (2000-2013) of the most comprehensive data available (USFWS LEMIS system), involving 11 billion individual specimens and an additional 977 million kilograms of wildlife. The majority of shipments contained mammals (27%), while the majority of specimens imported were shells (57%) and tropical fish (25%). Most imports were facilitated by the aquatic and pet industry, resulting in one-third of all shipments containing live animals. The importer reported origin of wildlife was 77.7% wild-caught and 17.7% captive-reared. Indonesia was the leading exporter of legal shipments, while Mexico was the leading source reported for illegal shipments. At the specimen level, China was the leading exporter of legal and illegal wildlife imports. The number of annual declared shipments doubled during the period examined, illustrating continually increasing demand, which reinforces the need to scale up capacity for border inspections, risk management protocols and disease surveillance. Most regulatory oversight of wildlife trade is aimed at conservation, rather than prevention of disease introduction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 55 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 27%
Student > Master 11 20%
Student > Bachelor 9 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Other 5 9%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 38%
Environmental Science 13 23%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 6 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 11%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 3 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 46. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2019.
All research outputs
#402,041
of 14,083,335 outputs
Outputs from EcoHealth
#17
of 536 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,833
of 351,727 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EcoHealth
#1
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,083,335 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 536 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 351,727 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.