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Depth of soil water uptake by tropical rainforest trees during dry periods: does tree dimension matter?

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, July 2013
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Title
Depth of soil water uptake by tropical rainforest trees during dry periods: does tree dimension matter?
Published in
Oecologia, July 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00442-013-2724-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Clément Stahl, Bruno Hérault, Vivien Rossi, Benoit Burban, Claude Bréchet, Damien Bonal

Abstract

Though the root biomass of tropical rainforest trees is concentrated in the upper soil layers, soil water uptake by deep roots has been shown to contribute to tree transpiration. A precise evaluation of the relationship between tree dimensions and depth of water uptake would be useful in tree-based modelling approaches designed to anticipate the response of tropical rainforest ecosystems to future changes in environmental conditions. We used an innovative dual-isotope labelling approach (deuterium in surface soil and oxygen at 120-cm depth) coupled with a modelling approach to investigate the role of tree dimensions in soil water uptake in a tropical rainforest exposed to seasonal drought. We studied 65 trees of varying diameter and height and with a wide range of predawn leaf water potential (Ψpd) values. We confirmed that about half of the studied trees relied on soil water below 100-cm depth during dry periods. Ψpd was negatively correlated with depth of water extraction and can be taken as a rough proxy of this depth. Some trees showed considerable plasticity in their depth of water uptake, exhibiting an efficient adaptive strategy for water and nutrient resource acquisition. We did not find a strong relationship between tree dimensions and depth of water uptake. While tall trees preferentially extract water from layers below 100-cm depth, shorter trees show broad variations in mean depth of water uptake. This precludes the use of tree dimensions to parameterize functional models.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 115 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Mexico 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 109 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 23%
Researcher 24 21%
Student > Master 22 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 9%
Unspecified 9 8%
Other 23 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 41%
Environmental Science 42 37%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 9%
Unspecified 10 9%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 3 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2014.
All research outputs
#11,518,342
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#2,947
of 3,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,787
of 151,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#45
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,103 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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