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Recent declines in cancer incidence: related to the Great Recession?

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Causes and Control, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 1,470)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
Recent declines in cancer incidence: related to the Great Recession?
Published in
Cancer Causes and Control, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10552-016-0846-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Scarlett Lin Gomez, Alison J. Canchola, David O. Nelson, Theresa H. M. Keegan, Christina A. Clarke, Iona Cheng, Salma Shariff-Marco, Mindy DeRouen, Ralph Catalano, William A. Satariano, Kathleen Davidson-Allen, Sally L. Glaser

Abstract

In recent years, cancer case counts in the U.S. underwent a large, rapid decline-an unexpected change given population growth for older persons at highest cancer risk. As these declines coincided with the Great Recession, we examined whether they were related to economic conditions. Using California Cancer Registry data from California's 30 most populous counties, we analyzed trends in cancer incidence during pre-recession (1996-2007) and recession/recovery (2008-2012) periods for all cancers combined and the ten most common sites. We evaluated the recession's association with rates using a multifactorial index that measured recession impact, and modeled associations between case counts and county-level unemployment rates using Poisson regression. Yearly cancer incidence rate declines were greater during the recession/recovery (3.3% among males, 1.4% among females) than before (0.7 and 0.5%, respectively), particularly for prostate, lung, and colorectal cancers. Lower case counts, especially for prostate and liver cancer among males and breast cancer, melanoma, and ovarian cancer among females, were associated with higher unemployment rates, irrespective of time period, but independent of secular effects. The associations for melanoma translated up to a 3.6% decrease in cases with each 1% increase in unemployment. Incidence declines were not greater in counties with higher recession impact index. Although recent declines in incidence of certain cancers are not differentially impacted by economic conditions related to the Great Recession relative to pre-recession conditions, the large recent absolute declines in the case counts of some cancer may be attributable to the large declines in unemployment in the recessionary period. This may occur through decreased engagement in preventive health behaviors, particularly for clinically less urgent cancers. Continued monitoring of trends is important to detect any rises in incidence rates as deferred diagnoses come to clinical attention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 27%
Student > Bachelor 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Researcher 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 9%
Social Sciences 1 9%
Other 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 111. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 March 2017.
All research outputs
#105,861
of 11,589,518 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Causes and Control
#13
of 1,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,357
of 323,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Causes and Control
#2
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,589,518 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,470 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,357 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.