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Staff and patient experiences of decision-making about continuous observation in psychiatric hospitals

Overview of attention for article published in Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology, February 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
Title
Staff and patient experiences of decision-making about continuous observation in psychiatric hospitals
Published in
Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology, February 2017
DOI 10.1007/s00127-017-1338-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kirsten Barnicot, Bryony Insua-Summerhayes, Emily Plummer, Alice Hart, Chris Barker, Stefan Priebe

Abstract

Continuous observation of psychiatric inpatients aims to protect those who pose an acute risk of harm to self or others, but involves intrusive privacy restrictions. Initiating, conducting and ending continuous observation requires complex decision-making about keeping patients safe whilst protecting their privacy. There is little published guidance about how to balance privacy and safety concerns, and how staff and patients negotiate this in practice is unknown. To inform best practice, the present study, therefore, aimed to understand how staff and patients experience negotiating the balance between privacy and safety during decision-making about continuous observation. Thematic analysis of qualitative interviews with thirty-one inpatient psychiatric staff and twenty-eight inpatients. Most patients struggled with the lack of privacy but valued feeling safe during continuous observation. Staff and patients linked good decision-making to using continuous observation for short periods and taking positive risks, understanding and collaborating with the patient, and working together as a supportive staff team. Poor decision-making was linked to insufficient consideration of observation's iatrogenic potential, insufficient collaboration with patients, and the stressful impact on staff of conducting observations and managing risk. Best practice in decision-making about continuous observation may be facilitated by making decisions in collaboration with patients, and by staff supporting each-other in positive risk-taking. To achieve truly patient-centred decision-making, decisions about observation should not be influenced by staff's own stress levels. To address the negative impact of staff stress on decision-making, it may be helpful to improve staff training, education and support structures.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Other 6 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 37%
Psychology 10 37%
Unspecified 2 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2018.
All research outputs
#1,780,845
of 13,034,813 outputs
Outputs from Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology
#372
of 1,620 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,002
of 343,707 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Social Psychiatry & Psychiatric Epidemiology
#18
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,034,813 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,620 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 343,707 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.