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Hand-grip strength of young men, women and highly trained female athletes

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, December 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 3,032)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
146 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor
q&a
1 Q&A thread
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
43 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
180 Mendeley
Title
Hand-grip strength of young men, women and highly trained female athletes
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, December 2006
DOI 10.1007/s00421-006-0351-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

D. Leyk, W. Gorges, D. Ridder, M. Wunderlich, T. Rüther, A. Sievert, D. Essfeld

Abstract

Hand-grip strength has been identified as one limiting factor for manual lifting and carrying loads. To obtain epidemiologically relevant hand-grip strength data for pre-employment screening, we determined maximal isometric hand-grip strength in 1,654 healthy men and 533 healthy women aged 20-25 years. Moreover, to assess the potential margins for improvement in hand-grip strength of women by training, we studied 60 highly trained elite female athletes from sports known to require high hand-grip forces (judo, handball). Maximal isometric hand-grip force was recorded over 15 s using a handheld hand-grip ergometer. Biometric parameters included lean body mass (LBM) and hand dimensions. Mean maximal hand-grip strength showed the expected clear difference between men (541 N) and women (329 N). Less expected was the gender related distribution of hand-grip strength: 90% of females produced less force than 95% of males. Though female athletes were significantly stronger (444 N) than their untrained female counterparts, this value corresponded to only the 25th percentile of the male subjects. Hand-grip strength was linearly correlated with LBM. Furthermore, both relative hand-grip strength parameters (F (max)/body weight and F (max)/LBM) did not show any correlation to hand dimensions. The present findings show that the differences in hand-grip strength of men and women are larger than previously reported. An appreciable difference still remains when using lean body mass as reference. The results of female national elite athletes even indicate that the strength level attainable by extremely high training will rarely surpass the 50th percentile of untrained or not specifically trained men.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 146 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 180 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 2 1%
Norway 2 1%
Australia 2 1%
France 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 165 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 68 38%
Student > Master 23 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 11%
Unspecified 14 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 7%
Other 43 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 53 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 32 18%
Unspecified 16 9%
Engineering 15 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 8%
Other 50 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 142. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2019.
All research outputs
#108,285
of 13,883,825 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#25
of 3,032 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,159
of 153,406 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#3
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,883,825 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,032 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 153,406 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.