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Identifying Health Experiences of Domestically Sex-Trafficked Women in the USA: A Qualitative Study in Rikers Island Jail

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Urban Health, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
21 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
Title
Identifying Health Experiences of Domestically Sex-Trafficked Women in the USA: A Qualitative Study in Rikers Island Jail
Published in
Journal of Urban Health, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11524-016-0128-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anita Ravi, Megan Rose Pfeiffer, Zachary Rosner, Judy A. Shea

Abstract

While sex trafficking in the USA is a significant medical and public health issue, there is sparse data on the healthcare needs of and access for this population. This study was designed to identify experiences of domestically sex-trafficked women regarding healthcare access, reproductive health, and infectious diseases while trafficked. Trafficking survivors incarcerated in New York City's Rikers Island women's jail participated in audio-recorded interviews between July and September 2015. Recordings were transcribed, and a content analysis was completed to identify health-related themes. Twenty-one women ranging from 19 to 60 years old were included in this study. Reasons for accessing care included sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV testing, unintended pregnancies, traumas, and chronic diseases. Emergency departments, Planned Parenthoods, and jails were common care sites. Traffickers and substance use impeded care and access to follow-up. Unintended pregnancy and STIs resulted in trafficker-perpetrated violence. Condoms, the most common form of contraception and HIV prevention, were inconsistently negotiated due to financial and violent consequences. These findings demonstrate that domestic sex trafficking survivors experienced chronic and acute health issues while trafficked and multiple barriers to care. Substance use and financial vulnerabilities furthered unintended pregnancy and infection risk. These findings can inform future research regarding healthcare access and practices for domestically trafficked women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 10 22%
Unspecified 8 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 17%
Student > Master 5 11%
Researcher 5 11%
Other 10 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 12 26%
Social Sciences 12 26%
Psychology 9 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Other 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 25. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2018.
All research outputs
#626,328
of 13,144,984 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Urban Health
#95
of 964 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,294
of 344,237 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Urban Health
#2
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,144,984 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 964 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 344,237 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.