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Variability in bumblebee pollination buzzes affects the quantity of pollen released from flowers

Overview of attention for article published in Oecologia, November 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
123 Mendeley
Title
Variability in bumblebee pollination buzzes affects the quantity of pollen released from flowers
Published in
Oecologia, November 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00442-012-2535-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul A. De Luca, Luc F. Bussière, Daniel Souto-Vilaros, Dave Goulson, Andrew C. Mason, Mario Vallejo-Marín

Abstract

Buzz-pollination is a plant strategy that promotes gamete transfer by requiring a pollinator, typically bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea), to vibrate a flower's anthers in order to extract pollen. Although buzz-pollination is widespread in angiosperms with over 20,000 species using it, little is known about the functional connection between natural variation in buzzing vibrations and the amount of pollen that can be extracted from anthers. We characterized variability in the vibrations produced by Bombus terrestris bumblebees while collecting pollen from Solanum rostratum (Solanaceae), a buzz-pollinated plant. We found substantial variation in several buzzing properties both within and among workers from a single colony. As expected, some of this variation was predicted by the physical attributes of individual bumblebees: heavier workers produced buzzes of greater amplitude. We then constructed artificial "pollination buzzes" that varied in three parameters (peak frequency, peak amplitude, and duration), and stimulated S. rostratum flowers with these synthetic buzzes to quantify the relationship between buzz properties and pollen removal. We found that greater amplitude and longer duration buzzes ejected substantially more pollen, while frequency had no directional effect and only a weak quadratic effect on the amount of pollen removed. These findings suggest that foraging bumblebees may improve pollen collection by increasing the duration or amplitude of their buzzes. Moreover, given that amplitude is positively correlated with mass, preferential foraging by heavier workers is likely to result in the largest pollen yields per bee, and this could have significant consequences for the success of a colony foraging on buzz-pollinated flowers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 123 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 3%
Serbia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 116 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 21%
Student > Master 22 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 17%
Student > Bachelor 19 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Other 26 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 93 76%
Unspecified 11 9%
Environmental Science 9 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 2%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 2%
Other 6 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2016.
All research outputs
#808,671
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Oecologia
#110
of 3,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,991
of 150,994 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Oecologia
#3
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,103 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 150,994 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.