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A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cancer Survivorship, January 2017
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Title
A dance intervention for cancer survivors and their partners (RHYTHM)
Published in
Journal of Cancer Survivorship, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/s11764-016-0593-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pisu, Maria, Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy, Kenzik, Kelly M, Oster, Robert A, Lin, Chee Paul, Manne, Sharon, Alvarez, Ronald, Martin, Michelle Y

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and impact of a ballroom dance intervention on improving quality of life (QOL) and relationship outcomes in cancer survivors and their partners. We conducted a pilot randomized controlled trial with two arms (Restoring Health in You (and Your Partner) through Movement, RHYTHM): (1) immediate dance intervention and (2) delayed intervention (wait-list control). The intervention consisted of 10 private weekly dance lessons and 2 practice parties over 12 weeks. Main outcomes were physical activity (Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire), functional capacity (6 Minute Walk Test), QOL (SF-36), Couples' trust (Dyadic Trust Scale), and other dyadic outcomes. Exit interviews were completed by all participating couples. Thirty-one women survivors (68% breast cancer) and their partners participated. Survivors were 57.9 years old on average and 22.6% African American. Partners had similar characteristics. RHYTHM had significant positive effects on physical activity (p = 0.05), on the mental component of QOL (p = 0.04), on vitality (p = 0.03), and on the dyadic trust scale (p = 0.04). Couples expressed satisfaction with the intervention including appreciating the opportunity to spend time and exercise together. Survivors saw this light-intensity physical activity as easing them into becoming more physically active. Light intensity ballroom dancing has the potential to improve cancer survivors' QOL. Larger trials are needed to build strong support for this ubiquitous and acceptable activity. Ballroom dance may be an important tool for cancer survivors to return to a physically active life and improve QOL and other aspects of their intimate life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 61 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 61 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 21%
Researcher 12 20%
Unspecified 8 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 11%
Other 13 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 15 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 15%
Sports and Recreations 8 13%
Psychology 5 8%
Other 15 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2017.
All research outputs
#6,787,743
of 8,907,341 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cancer Survivorship
#330
of 412 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#214,617
of 302,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cancer Survivorship
#17
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,907,341 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 412 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 302,196 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.