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Management of Depression in Patients with Dementia: Is Pharmacological Treatment Justified?

Overview of attention for article published in Drugs & Aging, January 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
Title
Management of Depression in Patients with Dementia: Is Pharmacological Treatment Justified?
Published in
Drugs & Aging, January 2017
DOI 10.1007/s40266-016-0434-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew H. Ford, Osvaldo P. Almeida

Abstract

Depression in the context of dementia is common and contributes to poorer outcomes in individuals and those who care for them. Non-pharmacological treatments are the preferred initial approach to managing these symptoms but data in support of these are scarce. There are a number of pharmacological treatment options available to clinicians but efficacy is uncertain and concern about potential side effects in an aging and vulnerable population needs to be taken into consideration. This review aims to provide a concise overview of pharmacological treatments for depression in dementia. Antidepressants are the mainstay of pharmacological treatment for clinically significant depression in the general population but evidence to support their use in dementia is mixed. Trials of antidepressants should generally be reserved for individuals with depression where the symptoms are distressing and surpass the threshold for major depression. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine are effective in the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease but current evidence does not support their use to treat depressive symptoms in dementia. Similarly, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers have no proven efficacy for depression and the risk of adverse effects seems to outweigh any potential benefit. Pain can be a frequent problem in dementia and may have significant effects on behavior and mood. Preliminary evidence supports a role of adequate analgesia in improving mood in people with dementia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 51 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 25%
Unspecified 9 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Researcher 5 10%
Other 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 35%
Unspecified 10 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Neuroscience 6 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 6%
Other 8 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 August 2017.
All research outputs
#3,445,181
of 13,500,356 outputs
Outputs from Drugs & Aging
#263
of 890 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,594
of 373,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Drugs & Aging
#9
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,500,356 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 890 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,515 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.