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Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices for Treatment of Alcohol and Drug Disorders: The Role of the State Authority

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, June 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
34 Mendeley
Title
Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices for Treatment of Alcohol and Drug Disorders: The Role of the State Authority
Published in
Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, June 2008
DOI 10.1007/s11414-008-9122-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Traci R. Rieckmann, Anne E. Kovas, Holly E. Fussell, Nicole M. Stettler

Abstract

The current climate of increasing performance expectations and diminishing resources, along with innovations in evidence-based practices (EBPs), creates new dilemmas for substance abuse treatment providers, policymakers, funders, and the service delivery system. This paper describes findings from baseline interviews with representatives from 49 state substance abuse authorities (SSAs). Interviews assessed efforts aimed at facilitating EBP adoption in each state and the District of Columbia. Results suggested that SSAs are concentrating more effort on EBP implementation strategies such as education, training, and infrastructure development, and less effort on financial mechanisms, regulations, and accreditation. The majority of SSAs use EBPs as a criterion in their contracts with providers, and just over half reported that EBP use is tied to state funding. To date, Oregon remains the only state with legislation that mandates treatment expenditures for EBPs; North Carolina follows suit with legislation that requires EBP promotion within current resources.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 3%
Unknown 33 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Student > Master 7 21%
Researcher 5 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 12%
Unspecified 3 9%
Other 6 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 13 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Psychology 6 18%
Unspecified 4 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2013.
All research outputs
#2,237,012
of 5,036,908 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research
#34
of 93 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,296
of 93,965 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research
#2
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,036,908 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 54th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 93 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 93,965 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.