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Enhanced recovery ERAS for elderly: a safe and beneficial pathway in colorectal surgery

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Colorectal Disease, October 2016
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  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
Title
Enhanced recovery ERAS for elderly: a safe and beneficial pathway in colorectal surgery
Published in
International Journal of Colorectal Disease, October 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00384-016-2691-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. Slieker, P. Frauche, J. Jurt, V. Addor, C. Blanc, Nicolas Demartines, M. Hübner

Abstract

Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) pathway includes recovery goals requiring active participation of the patients; this may be perceived as "aggressive" care in older patients. The aim of the present study was to assess whether ERAS was feasible and beneficial in older patients. Since June 2011, all consecutive colorectal patients were included in an ERAS pathway and documented in a dedicated prospective database. This retrospective analysis included 513 patients, 311 younger patients (<70 years) and 202 older patients (≥70 years). Outcomes were adherence to the ERAS pathway, functional recovery, postoperative complications, and hospital stay. Older patients had significantly more diabetes, malignancies, cardiac, and respiratory co-morbidities; both groups underwent similar surgical procedures. Overall adherence to the ERAS pathway was in median 78 % in younger and 74 % in older patients (P = 0.86). In older patients, urinary drains were kept longer (P = 0.001), and oral fluid intake was reduced from day 0 to day 3 (P < 0.001). There were no differences in mobilization and intake of nutritional supplements. Postoperative complications were similar for both comparative groups (51.5 vs. 46.6 %, P = 0.32). Median length of stay was 7 days (IQR 5-13) in older patients vs. 6 days (IQR 4-10) in the younger group (P = 0.001). Adherence to the ERAS pathway was equally high in older patients. Despite more co-morbidities, older patients did not experience more complications. Recovery was similar and hospital stay was only 1 day longer than in younger patients. ERAS pathway is of value for all patients and does not need any adaptation for the elderly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 7 18%
Other 7 18%
Student > Bachelor 7 18%
Student > Master 5 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 9 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 53%
Unspecified 9 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2017.
All research outputs
#7,024,199
of 12,220,568 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Colorectal Disease
#447
of 964 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#157,499
of 332,056 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Colorectal Disease
#8
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,568 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 964 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 332,056 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.