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Role of l-carnosine in the control of blood glucose, blood pressure, thermogenesis, and lipolysis by autonomic nerves in rats: involvement of the circadian clock and histamine

Overview of attention for article published in Amino Acids, February 2012
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Title
Role of l-carnosine in the control of blood glucose, blood pressure, thermogenesis, and lipolysis by autonomic nerves in rats: involvement of the circadian clock and histamine
Published in
Amino Acids, February 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00726-012-1251-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katsuya Nagai, Mamoru Tanida, Akira Niijima, Nobuo Tsuruoka, Yoshinobu Kiso, Yuko Horii, Jiao Shen, Nobuaki Okumura

Abstract

L-carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine; CAR) is synthesized in mammalian skeletal muscle. Although the physiological roles of CAR have not yet been clarified, there is evidence that the release of CAR from skeletal muscle during physical exercise affects autonomic neurotransmission and physiological functions. In particular, CAR affects the activity of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves innervating the adrenal glands, liver, kidney, pancreas, stomach, and white and brown adipose tissues, thereby causing changes in blood pressure, blood glucose, appetite, lipolysis, and thermogenesis. CAR-mediated changes in neurotransmission and physiological functions were eliminated by histamine H1 or H3 receptor antagonists (diphenhydramine or thioperamide) and bilateral lesions of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a master circadian clock. Moreover, a carnosine-degrading enzyme (carnosinase 2) was shown to be localized to histamine neurons in the hypothalamic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN). Thus, CAR released from skeletal muscle during exercise may be transported into TMN-histamine neurons and hydrolyzed. The resulting L-histidine may subsequently be converted into histamine, which could be responsible for the effects of CAR on neurotransmission and physiological function. Thus, CAR appears to influence hypoglycemic, hypotensive, and lipolytic activity through regulation of autonomic nerves and with the involvement of the SCN and histamine. These findings are reviewed and discussed in the context of other recent reports, including those on carnosine synthetases, carnosinases, and carnosine transport.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Russia 2 4%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 44 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 19%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 13 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 21%
Sports and Recreations 10 21%
Neuroscience 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Other 8 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2013.
All research outputs
#10,837,564
of 12,226,226 outputs
Outputs from Amino Acids
#850
of 1,015 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,074
of 142,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Amino Acids
#12
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,226,226 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,015 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.