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Narrowing racial gaps in breast cancer chemotherapy initiation: the role of the patient–provider relationship

Overview of attention for article published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, April 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 911)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
Title
Narrowing racial gaps in breast cancer chemotherapy initiation: the role of the patient–provider relationship
Published in
Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, April 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10549-013-2520-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vanessa B. Sheppard, Claudine Isaacs, George Luta, Shawna C. Willey, Marc Boisvert, Felicity W. K. Harper, Karen Smith, Sara Horton, Minetta C. Liu, Yvonne Jennings, Fikru Hirpa, Felicia Snead, Jeanne S. Mandelblatt

Abstract

Chemotherapy improves breast cancer survival but is underused more often in black than in white women. We examined associations between patient-physician relationships and chemotherapy initiation and timeliness of initiation among black and white patients. Women with primary invasive, non-metastatic breast cancer were recruited via hospitals (in Washington, DC and Detroit) and community outreach between July 2006 and April 2011. Data were collected via telephone interviews and medical records. Logistic regression models evaluated associations between chemotherapy initiation and independent variables. Since there were race interactions, analyses were race-stratified. Factors associated with time from surgery to chemotherapy initiation and delay of ≥90 days were evaluated with linear and logistic regressions, respectively. Among eligible women, 82.8 % were interviewed and 359 (90.9 %) of those had complete data. The odds of initiating chemotherapy were 3.26 times (95 % CI: 1.51, 7.06) higher among black women reporting greater communication with physicians (vs. lesser), after considering covariates. In contrast, the odds of starting chemotherapy were lower for white women reporting greater communication (vs. lesser) (adjusted OR 0.22, 95 % CI: 0.07, 0.73). The opposing direction of associations was also seen among the sub-set of black and white women with definitive clinical indications for chemotherapy. Among those initiating treatment, black women had longer mean time to the start of chemotherapy than whites (71.8 vs. 55.0 days, p = 0.005), but race was not significant after considering trust in oncologists, where initiation time decreased as trust increased, controlling for covariates. Black women were also more likely to delay ≥90 days than whites (27 vs. 8.3 %; p = 0.024), but this was not significant after considering religiosity. The patient-physician dyad and sociocultural factors may represent leverage points to improve chemotherapy patterns in black women.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 20 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Other 5 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 29%
Social Sciences 4 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 10%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 2 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2013.
All research outputs
#157,746
of 3,632,582 outputs
Outputs from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#29
of 911 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,976
of 85,802 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast Cancer Research and Treatment
#4
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,632,582 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 911 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 85,802 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.