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The optomotor response of the praying mantis is driven predominantly by the central visual field

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology, December 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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3 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
Title
The optomotor response of the praying mantis is driven predominantly by the central visual field
Published in
Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology, December 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00359-016-1139-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vivek Nityananda, Ghaith Tarawneh, Steven Errington, Ignacio Serrano-Pedraza, Jenny Read

Abstract

The optomotor response has been widely used to investigate insect sensitivity to contrast and motion. Several studies have revealed the sensitivity of this response to frequency and contrast, but we know less about the spatial integration underlying this response. Specifically, few studies have investigated how the horizontal angular extent of stimuli influences the optomotor response. We presented mantises with moving gratings of varying horizontal extents at three different contrasts in the central or peripheral regions of their visual fields. We assessed the relative effectivity of different regions to elicit the optomotor response and modelled the dependency of the response on the angular extent subtended by stimuli at these different regions. Our results show that the optomotor response is governed by stimuli in the central visual field and not in the periphery. The model also shows that in the central region, the probability of response increases linearly with increase in horizontal extent up to a saturation point. Furthermore, the dependency of the optomotor response on the angular extent of the stimulus is modulated by contrast. We discuss the implications of our results for different modes of stimulus presentation and for models of the underlying mechanisms of motion detection in the mantis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 9%
Italy 1 4%
Unknown 20 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 30%
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 13%
Unspecified 3 13%
Professor 2 9%
Other 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 39%
Psychology 5 22%
Unspecified 4 17%
Neuroscience 3 13%
Computer Science 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2017.
All research outputs
#6,325,439
of 12,219,322 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology
#556
of 978 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#127,738
of 330,945 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology
#7
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,219,322 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 978 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 330,945 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.