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Life in the fat lane: seasonal regulation of insulin sensitivity, food intake, and adipose biology in brown bears

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 519)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
Title
Life in the fat lane: seasonal regulation of insulin sensitivity, food intake, and adipose biology in brown bears
Published in
Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology, December 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00360-016-1050-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. S. Rigano, J. L. Gehring, B. D. Evans Hutzenbiler, A. V. Chen, O. L. Nelson, C. A. Vella, C. T. Robbins, H. T. Jansen

Abstract

Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) have evolved remarkable metabolic adaptations including enormous fat accumulation during the active season followed by fasting during hibernation. However, these fluctuations in body mass do not cause the same harmful effects associated with obesity in humans. To better understand these seasonal transitions, we performed insulin and glucose tolerance tests in captive grizzly bears, characterized the annual profiles of circulating adipokines, and tested the anorectic effects of centrally administered leptin at different times of the year. We also used bear gluteal adipocyte cultures to test insulin and beta-adrenergic sensitivity in vitro. Bears were insulin resistant during hibernation but were sensitive during the spring and fall active periods. Hibernating bears remained euglycemic, possibly due to hyperinsulinemia and hyperglucagonemia. Adipokine concentrations were relatively low throughout the active season but peaked in mid-October prior to hibernation when fat content was greatest. Serum glycerol was highest during hibernation, indicating ongoing lipolysis. Centrally administered leptin reduced food intake in October, but not in August, revealing seasonal variation in the brain's sensitivity to its anorectic effects. This was supported by strong phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 labeling within the hypothalamus of hibernating bears; labeling virtually disappeared in active bears. Adipocytes collected during hibernation were insulin resistant when cultured with hibernation serum but became sensitive when cultured with active season serum. Heat treatment of active serum blocked much of this action. Clarifying the cellular mechanisms responsible for the physiology of hibernating bears may inform new treatments for metabolic disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 30%
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Student > Master 4 15%
Researcher 3 11%
Unspecified 3 11%
Other 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 33%
Unspecified 5 19%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2019.
All research outputs
#875,737
of 13,256,487 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology
#11
of 519 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,706
of 369,492 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Comparative Physiology B: Biochemical, Systemic, & Environmental Physiology
#3
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,256,487 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 519 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 369,492 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.