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Efficacy, feasibility, and acceptability of a novel technology-based intervention to support physical activity in cancer survivors

Overview of attention for article published in Supportive Care in Cancer, December 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
122 Mendeley
Title
Efficacy, feasibility, and acceptability of a novel technology-based intervention to support physical activity in cancer survivors
Published in
Supportive Care in Cancer, December 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00520-016-3523-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nancy M. Gell, Kristin W. Grover, Morgan Humble, Michelle Sexton, Kim Dittus

Abstract

Physical activity is known to minimize the long-term side effects of cancer treatment. Yet, rates of physical activity participation by cancer survivors are significantly lower compared to the general population. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the efficacy, feasibility, and acceptability of a technology-based intervention to promote maintenance of physical activity after completing an exercise-based oncology rehabilitation program. The pre-post 4-week intervention included support delivered through tailored text messages, Fitbit® self-monitoring, and brief health coaching sessions. The primary outcome measure was accelerometer-assessed physical activity levels. Self-efficacy, self-regulation, social support, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and Fitbit® step counts were assessed as secondary outcomes. Twenty-four participants (20 females; mean age = 57.9 years ± 10.4) completed the intervention. Mean daily step counts and weekly minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity were maintained after the intervention, as compared to baseline levels achieved at the end of 12 weeks of exercise-based oncology rehabilitation. Both self-regulation (goal setting, relapse prevention) and fatigue severity increased significantly post intervention as compared to baseline (p = 0.05 and p = 0.02, respectively). Qualitative responses demonstrated overall satisfaction with intervention components. Results demonstrate efficacy of the intervention for maintenance of physical activity levels achieved during exercise-based oncology rehabilitation. Low attrition and high satisfaction provide evidence for both the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention components. Exercise interventions post oncology treatment provide multiple benefits for cancer survivors, yet continued maintenance after program completion is challenging. Technological options offer low-cost, accessible modes to deliver continued monitoring and support beyond traditional facility-based programs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 120 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 21%
Student > Bachelor 20 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 15%
Unspecified 18 15%
Researcher 17 14%
Other 23 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 25%
Unspecified 29 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 18%
Psychology 15 12%
Social Sciences 7 6%
Other 19 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2017.
All research outputs
#2,230,263
of 13,022,627 outputs
Outputs from Supportive Care in Cancer
#574
of 2,549 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,883
of 371,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Supportive Care in Cancer
#25
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,022,627 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,549 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 371,852 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.