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Eukaryotic diversity in premise drinking water using 18S rDNA sequencing: implications for health risks

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Pollution Research, April 2013
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
Title
Eukaryotic diversity in premise drinking water using 18S rDNA sequencing: implications for health risks
Published in
Environmental Science & Pollution Research, April 2013
DOI 10.1007/s11356-013-1646-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Helen Y. Buse, Jingrang Lu, Ian T. Struewing, Nicholas J. Ashbolt

Abstract

The goal of this study was to characterize microbial eukaryotes over a 12-month period to provide insight into the occurrence of potential bacterial predators and hosts in premise plumbing. Nearly 6,300 partial 18S rRNA gene sequences from 24 hot (36.9-39.0 °C) and cold (6.8-29.1 °C) drinking water samples were analyzed and classified into major eukaryotic groups. Each major group, consisting of free-living amoebae (FLA)/protozoa, algae, copepods, dinoflagellates, fungi, nematodes, and unique uncultured eukaryotic sequences, showed limited diversity dominated by a few distinct populations, which may be characteristic of oligotrophic environments. Changes in the relative abundance of predators such as nematodes, copepods, and FLA appear to be related to temperature and seasonal changes in water quality. Sequences nearly identical to FLA such as Hartmannella vermiformis, Echinamoeba thermarmum, Pseudoparamoeba pagei, Protacanthamoeba bohemica, Platyamoeba sp., and Vannella sp. were obtained. In addition to FLA, various copepods, rotifers, and nematodes have been reported to internalize viral and bacterial pathogens within drinking water systems thus potentially serving as transport hosts; implications of which are discussed further. Increasing the knowledge of eukaryotic occurrence and their relationship with potential pathogens should aid in assessing microbial risk associated with various eukaryotic organisms in drinking water.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Switzerland 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Unknown 46 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 14%
Student > Master 7 14%
Professor 3 6%
Other 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 41%
Environmental Science 11 22%
Unspecified 6 12%
Engineering 5 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Other 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2013.
All research outputs
#7,512,666
of 13,027,942 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#1,001
of 3,584 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,065
of 148,228 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Pollution Research
#19
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,027,942 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,584 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 148,228 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.