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Values and adult age: findings from two cohorts of the European Social Survey

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Ageing, October 2012
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Citations

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51 Mendeley
Title
Values and adult age: findings from two cohorts of the European Social Survey
Published in
European Journal of Ageing, October 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10433-012-0247-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Oliver C. Robinson

Abstract

Human values are assessed biannually in a multinational sample as part of the European Social Survey (ESS). Based on theories of adaptive ageing, it was predicted that ten lower order values and four higher order values would show age differences that would be invariant across (a) two sample cohorts (2002 and 2008), (b) gender and (c) 12 industrialised nations. The value categories measured by the ESS are the following: conservative values (tradition, conformity and security), openness to change values (self-direction, hedonism and stimulation), self-transcendent values (universalism, benevolence) and self-enhancement values (power, achievement). Of the ten lower order values, tradition shows the strongest positive relation with adult age, while the value of stimulation shows the strongest negative relation with age. With regards to the four higher order value categories, conservative values increased across age groups, while openness to change values decreased. Neither of these value types showed cohort or gender differences. Self-transcendence values were greater in midlife and older adults compared with young adults, were higher in women than in men, and higher in the 2008 compared with the 2002 cohort. Self-enhancement values showed a negative relation with age, with men of all age groups scoring higher in this value type than women. Age effects on the four higher order value types were replicated across all 12 countries in the sample, with the single exception of self-enhancement values in Spain, which show no relation with age.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 11 22%
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Student > Master 7 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 3 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 20 39%
Psychology 17 33%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2019.
All research outputs
#8,242,022
of 13,644,402 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Ageing
#122
of 184 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#76,872
of 150,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Ageing
#5
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,644,402 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 184 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 150,049 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.