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Migraine and the risk of stroke: an updated meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies

Overview of attention for article published in Neurological Sciences, October 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
21 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
Migraine and the risk of stroke: an updated meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies
Published in
Neurological Sciences, October 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10072-016-2746-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xianming Hu, Yingchun Zhou, Hongyang Zhao, Cheng Peng

Abstract

Dozens of observational studies and two meta-analyses have investigated the association of migraine with the risk of stroke, but their results are inconsistent. We aimed to quantitatively evaluate the relationship between migraine and stroke risk by performing a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. PubMed and Embase were searched through July 2016 to identify studies that met pre-stated inclusion criterion and reference lists of retrieved articles were also reviewed. Information on the characteristics of the included study, risk estimates, and control for possible confounding factors were extracted independently by two authors. The random-effects model was used to calculate the pooled risk estimates. Eleven prospective cohort studies involving 3371 patients with stroke and 2,221,888 participants were included in this systematic review. Compared with non-migraineurs, the pooled relative risks of total stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, and ischemic stroke for migraineurs were 1.55 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38-1.75], 1.15 (95% CI 0.85-1.56), and 1.64 (95% CI 1.22-2.20), respectively. Exception of any single study did not materially alter the combined risk estimate. Integrated epidemiological evidence supports that migraine should be associated with the increased risk of total stroke and ischemic stroke, but the relationship between migraine and the risk of hemorrhagic stroke is not of certainty.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 23%
Student > Postgraduate 4 15%
Other 3 12%
Student > Master 3 12%
Researcher 2 8%
Other 8 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 62%
Unspecified 3 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 8%
Computer Science 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2018.
All research outputs
#2,015,743
of 12,931,138 outputs
Outputs from Neurological Sciences
#160
of 1,144 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,291
of 373,223 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neurological Sciences
#5
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,931,138 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,144 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 373,223 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.