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Does Elite Sport Degrade Sleep Quality? A Systematic Review

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#37 of 2,199)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
twitter
297 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
55 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
192 Mendeley
Title
Does Elite Sport Degrade Sleep Quality? A Systematic Review
Published in
Sports Medicine, November 2016
DOI 10.1007/s40279-016-0650-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luke Gupta, Kevin Morgan, Sarah Gilchrist

Abstract

Information on sleep quality and insomnia symptomatology among elite athletes remains poorly systematised in the sports science and medicine literature. The extent to which performance in elite sport represents a risk for chronic insomnia is unknown. The purpose of this systematic review was to profile the objective and experienced characteristics of sleep among elite athletes, and to consider relationships between elite sport and insomnia symptomatology. Studies relating to sleep involving participants described on a pre-defined continuum of 'eliteness' were located through a systematic search of four research databases: SPORTDiscus, PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scholar, up to April 2016. Once extracted, studies were categorised as (1) those mainly describing sleep structure/patterns, (2) those mainly describing sleep quality and insomnia symptomatology and (3) those exploring associations between aspects of elite sport and sleep outcomes. The search returned 1676 records. Following screening against set criteria, a total of 37 studies were identified. The quality of evidence reviewed was generally low. Pooled sleep quality data revealed high levels of sleep complaints in elite athletes. Three risk factors for sleep disturbance were broadly identified: (1) training, (2) travel and (3) competition. While acknowledging the limited number of high-quality evidence reviewed, athletes show a high overall prevalence of insomnia symptoms characterised by longer sleep latencies, greater sleep fragmentation, non-restorative sleep, and excessive daytime fatigue. These symptoms show marked inter-sport differences. Two underlying mechanisms are implicated in the mediation of sport-related insomnia symptoms: pre-sleep cognitive arousal and sleep restriction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 297 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 192 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 191 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 18%
Student > Master 35 18%
Student > Bachelor 31 16%
Researcher 22 11%
Unspecified 20 10%
Other 49 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 98 51%
Unspecified 26 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 11%
Psychology 12 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 6%
Other 24 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 262. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 September 2019.
All research outputs
#46,972
of 13,532,900 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine
#37
of 2,199 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,652
of 377,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine
#2
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,532,900 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,199 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 32.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 377,481 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.