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Meat intake, cooking methods and doneness and risk of colorectal tumours in the Spanish multicase-control study (MCC-Spain)

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nutrition, November 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
Title
Meat intake, cooking methods and doneness and risk of colorectal tumours in the Spanish multicase-control study (MCC-Spain)
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition, November 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00394-016-1350-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jordi de Batlle, Esther Gracia-Lavedan, Dora Romaguera, Michelle Mendez, Gemma Castaño-Vinyals, Vicente Martín, Núria Aragonés, Inés Gómez-Acebo, Rocío Olmedo-Requena, José Juan Jimenez-Moleon, Marcela Guevara, Mikel Azpiri, Cristóbal Llorens-Ivorra, Guillermo Fernandez-Tardon, Jose Andrés Lorca, José María Huerta, Victor Moreno, Elena Boldo, Beatriz Pérez-Gómez, Jesús Castilla, Tania Fernández-Villa, Juan Pablo Barrio, Montserrat Andreu, Antoni Castells, Trinidad Dierssen, Jone M. Altzibar, Manolis Kogevinas, Marina Pollán, Pilar Amiano

Abstract

Although there is convincing evidence that red and processed meat intake increases the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), the potential role of meat cooking practices has not been established yet and could partly explain the current heterogeneity of results among studies. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association between meat consumption and cooking practices and the risk of CRC in a population-based case-control study. A total of 1671 CRC cases and 3095 controls recruited in Spain between September 2008 and December 2013 completing a food frequency questionnaire with a meat-specific module were included in the analyses. Odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression models adjusted for known confounders. Total meat intake was associated with increased risk of CRC (OR T3-T1 1.41; 95% CI 1.19-1.67; p trend < 0.001), and similar associations were found for white, red and processed/cured/organ meat. Rare-cooked meat preference was associated with low risk of CRC in red meat (ORrare vs. medium 0.66; 95% CI 0.51-0.85) and total meat (ORrare vs. medium 0.56; 95% CI 0.37-0.86) consumers, these associations being stronger in women than in men. Griddle-grilled/barbecued meat was associated with an increased CRC risk (total meat: OR 1.45; 95% CI 1.13-1.87). Stewing (OR 1.25; 95% CI 1.04-1.51) and oven-baking (OR 1.18; 95% CI 1.00-1.40) were associated with increased CRC risk of white, but not red, meat. Our study supports an association of white, red, processed/cured/organ and total meat intake with an increased risk of CRC. Moreover, our study showed that cooking practices can modulate such risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Unknown 48 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 27%
Student > Bachelor 8 16%
Other 5 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Student > Master 3 6%
Other 11 22%
Unknown 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 4%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2019.
All research outputs
#1,144,439
of 13,989,129 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nutrition
#277
of 1,561 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,120
of 380,884 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nutrition
#8
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,989,129 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,561 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 380,884 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.