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Is Obesity Contagious by Way of Body Image? A Study on Japanese Female Students in the United States

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Community Health, April 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
31 Mendeley
Title
Is Obesity Contagious by Way of Body Image? A Study on Japanese Female Students in the United States
Published in
Journal of Community Health, April 2013
DOI 10.1007/s10900-013-9686-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rinako Bagrowicz, Chiho Watanabe, Masahiro Umezaki

Abstract

Although it has been suggested that obesity is 'contagious' within the social network, direct cause of this spread of obesity remains unclear. This study hypothesized that Body Image (BI), the perception of one's own body size, may play a role in this obesity spread, since a high prevalence of obesity could shift people's perception of 'what is normal'. Young Japanese females (n = 53) were interviewed within 1 month after moving to New York City, where the prevalence of obesity is substantially higher than that of their home country, Japan. Each participant was examined for her BI in terms of current body size (CBS) and ideal body size (IBS). They were interviewed again 2 months after the first examination. Between the two interviews, the participants' CBS was decreased (having thinner self-image), while the IBS increased (having fatter ideal-image), leading to less dissatisfaction (smaller CBS-IBS) with their body size. These results suggest that one's BI could change in a period as short as 2 months, possibly because of being surrounded by more obese people. The IBS change was positively associated with BMI change (increased by 0.4 ± 0.6 kg/m²), warranting further study on the role of BI in the spread of obesity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 3%
Unknown 30 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Student > Master 5 16%
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Other 8 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 35%
Psychology 6 19%
Social Sciences 5 16%
Unspecified 2 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 6 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 April 2017.
All research outputs
#1,003,822
of 12,319,703 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Community Health
#62
of 752 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,072
of 141,543 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Community Health
#2
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,319,703 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 752 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 141,543 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.