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Bacterial signals N-acyl homoserine lactones induce the changes of morphology and ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Overview of attention for article published in AMB Express, November 2016
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Title
Bacterial signals N-acyl homoserine lactones induce the changes of morphology and ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Published in
AMB Express, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13568-016-0292-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ge Ren, Anzhou Ma, Weifeng Liu, Xuliang Zhuang, Guoqiang Zhuang

Abstract

The bacterial quorum sensing signals N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are able to regulate a diverse array of physiological activities, such as symbiosis, virulence and biofilm formation, depending on population density. Recently, it has been discovered that the bacterial quorum sensing (QS) signal molecules can induce extensive response of higher eukaryotes including plants and mammalian cells. However, little is known about the response of fungi reacting to these bacterial signals. Here we showed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as an ancient eukaryote and widely used for alcoholic beverage and bioethanol production, exposed to short-chain 3-OC6-HSL and long-chain C12-HSL appeared obvious changes in morphology and ethanol tolerance. AHLs could increase the frequency of cells with bipolar and multipolar buds, and these changes did not present distinct differences when induced by different types (3-OC6-HSL and C12-HSL) and varied concentrations (200 nM and 2 μM) of AHLs. Further investigation by flow cytometer displayed that the cells untreated by AHLs reduced cell size (decreased FSC) and enhanced intracellular density (increased in SSC), compared with the AHLs-induced cells after incubation 6 h. In addition, the long-chain C12-HSL could slightly increase the ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae while the short-chain HSL obviously decreased it. Our study would be valuable to further research on the interaction between prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes, and be reference for industrial production of bioethanol.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 18%
Researcher 3 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 5 23%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 32%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 9%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 4 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2016.
All research outputs
#4,675,837
of 8,670,160 outputs
Outputs from AMB Express
#241
of 543 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#161,428
of 296,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AMB Express
#19
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,670,160 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 543 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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