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Nonequilibrium thermodynamics and maximum entropy production in the Earth system

Overview of attention for article published in Naturwissenschaften, February 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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93 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
127 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Nonequilibrium thermodynamics and maximum entropy production in the Earth system
Published in
Naturwissenschaften, February 2009
DOI 10.1007/s00114-009-0509-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Axel Kleidon

Abstract

The Earth system is maintained in a unique state far from thermodynamic equilibrium, as, for instance, reflected in the high concentration of reactive oxygen in the atmosphere. The myriad of processes that transform energy, that result in the motion of mass in the atmosphere, in oceans, and on land, processes that drive the global water, carbon, and other biogeochemical cycles, all have in common that they are irreversible in their nature. Entropy production is a general consequence of these processes and measures their degree of irreversibility. The proposed principle of maximum entropy production (MEP) states that systems are driven to steady states in which they produce entropy at the maximum possible rate given the prevailing constraints. In this review, the basics of nonequilibrium thermodynamics are described, as well as how these apply to Earth system processes. Applications of the MEP principle are discussed, ranging from the strength of the atmospheric circulation, the hydrological cycle, and biogeochemical cycles to the role that life plays in these processes. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics and the MEP principle have potentially wide-ranging implications for our understanding of Earth system functioning, how it has evolved in the past, and why it is habitable. Entropy production allows us to quantify an objective direction of Earth system change (closer to vs further away from thermodynamic equilibrium, or, equivalently, towards a state of MEP). When a maximum in entropy production is reached, MEP implies that the Earth system reacts to perturbations primarily with negative feedbacks. In conclusion, this nonequilibrium thermodynamic view of the Earth system shows great promise to establish a holistic description of the Earth as one system. This perspective is likely to allow us to better understand and predict its function as one entity, how it has evolved in the past, and how it is modified by human activities in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 5%
Colombia 2 2%
France 2 2%
Netherlands 2 2%
Canada 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Benin 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 107 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 36 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 23%
Student > Master 15 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 9%
Student > Bachelor 10 8%
Other 23 18%
Unknown 3 2%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 24%
Environmental Science 23 18%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 18 14%
Physics and Astronomy 16 13%
Engineering 11 9%
Other 21 17%
Unknown 7 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2018.
All research outputs
#1,977,075
of 13,612,359 outputs
Outputs from Naturwissenschaften
#321
of 1,491 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,103
of 148,740 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Naturwissenschaften
#3
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,612,359 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,491 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 148,740 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.