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The auditory system of non-calling grasshoppers (Melanoplinae: Podismini) and the evolutionary regression of their tympanal ears

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology, August 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
The auditory system of non-calling grasshoppers (Melanoplinae: Podismini) and the evolutionary regression of their tympanal ears
Published in
Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology, August 2010
DOI 10.1007/s00359-010-0560-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gerlind U. C. Lehmann, Sandra Berger, Johannes Strauß, Arne W. Lehmann, Hans-Joachim Pflüger

Abstract

Reduction of tympanal hearing organs is repeatedly found amongst insects and is associated with weakened selection for hearing. There is also an associated wing reduction, since flight is no longer required to evade bats. Wing reduction may also affect sound production. Here, the auditory system in four silent grasshopper species belonging to the Podismini is investigated. In this group, tympanal ears occur but sound signalling does not. The tympanal organs range from fully developed to remarkably reduced tympana. To evaluate the effects of tympanal regression on neuronal organisation and auditory sensitivity, the size of wings and tympana, sensory thresholds and sensory central projections are compared. Reduced tympanal size correlates with a higher auditory threshold. The threshold curves of all four species are tuned to low frequencies with a maximal sensitivity at 3-5 kHz. Central projections of the tympanal nerve show characteristics known from fully tympanate acridid species, so neural elements for tympanal hearing have been strongly conserved across these species. The results also confirm the correlation between reduction in auditory sensitivity and wing reduction. It is concluded that the auditory sensitivity of all four species may be maintained by stabilising selective forces, such as predation.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 7%
Finland 1 3%
Germany 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 24 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 38%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Master 4 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 66%
Neuroscience 3 10%
Engineering 2 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Psychology 1 3%
Other 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 August 2010.
All research outputs
#761,638
of 5,030,073 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology
#79
of 636 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,641
of 93,553 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Comparative Physiology A: Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural & Behavioral Physiology
#3
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,030,073 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 636 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 93,553 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.