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Effects of creatine supplementation on renal function: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, January 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
39 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
video
3 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Effects of creatine supplementation on renal function: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, January 2008
DOI 10.1007/s00421-007-0669-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bruno Gualano, Carlos Ugrinowitsch, Rafael Batista Novaes, Guilherme Gianini Artioli, Maria Heloisa Shimizu, Antonio Carlos Seguro, Roger Charles Harris, Antonio Herbert Lancha

Abstract

Creatine (CR) supplementation is commonly used by athletes. However, its effects on renal function remain controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of creatine supplementation on renal function in healthy sedentary males (18-35 years old) submitted to exercise training. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed. Subjects (n = 18) were randomly allocated to receive treatment with either creatine (CR) ( approximately 10 g day(-1) over 3 months) or placebo (PL) (dextrose). All subjects undertook moderate intensity aerobic training, in three 40-min sessions per week, during 3 months. Serum creatinine, serum and urinary sodium and potassium were determined at baseline and at the end of the study. Cystatin C was assessed prior to training (PRE), after 4 (POST 4) and 12 weeks (POST 12). Cystatin C levels (mg L(-1)) (PRE CR: 0.82 +/- 0.09; PL: 0.88 +/- 0.07 vs. POST 12 CR: 0.71 +/- 0.06; PL: 0.75 +/- 0.09, P = 0.0001) were decreased over time, suggesting an increase in glomerular filtration rate. Serum creatinine decreased with training in PL but was unchanged with training in CR. No significant differences were observed within or between groups in other parameters investigated. The decrease in cystatin C indicates that high-dose creatine supplementation over 3 months does not provoke any renal dysfunction in healthy males undergoing aerobic training. In addition, the results suggest that moderate aerobic training per se may improve renal function.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 2%
Switzerland 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Norway 1 1%
Unknown 92 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 31 32%
Student > Master 19 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 8%
Researcher 7 7%
Other 23 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 22%
Sports and Recreations 20 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 12%
Unspecified 11 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 10%
Other 23 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 65. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2019.
All research outputs
#263,762
of 13,465,426 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#84
of 2,980 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,664
of 148,197 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#5
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,465,426 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,980 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 148,197 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.